There is a dead girl walking the quiet streets of Applegate, leaving mangled bodies of child murderers in her wake. But when a boy with strange tattoos moves into the neighborhood, so, she realizes, does something else.

BOOKS IN THE SERIES

 

 

AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING STORES

THE BUZZ

Kirkus Reviews

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“[A] Stephen King–like horror story…A chilling, bloody ghost story that resonates.”

Booklist

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“There’s a superior creep factor that is pervasive in every lyrical word of Chupeco’s debut, and it’s perfect for teens who enjoy traditional horror movies and stories… solidly scary and well worth the read.”

Publishers Weekly

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“[STARRED REVIEW] Chupeco makes a powerful debut with this unsettling ghost story…told in a marvelously disjointed fashion from Okiku’s numbers-obsessed point of view, this story unfolds with creepy imagery and an intimate appreciation for Japanese horror, myth, and legend.”

School Library Journal

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“A dark novel that will appeal to horror fans, lovers of Elizabeth Scott’s ‘Living Dead Girl.'”

RT Book Reviews

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“The Girl from the Well is part The Ring, part The Grudge and part The Exorcist…A fantastically creepy story sure to keep readers up at night… Okiku is one of the most interesting YA characters to date. 4 1/2 Stars-TOP PICK!”

VOYA Magazine

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“This horror mystery has just the right blend of contemporary teenage life and the fantasy of a ghost story. It is well written and fast paced, and the characters both dead and alive are developed and engaging…well worth having in a teen collection that caters to fantasy and horror lovers.”

Paperback Wonderland

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“The writing is beautiful. Descriptive in a poetic way, which just makes everything even creepier…I don’t even know how to properly praise her [Chupeco], but she has to be one of the most talented writers to be published recently.”

The Book Smugglers

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“The debut novel from Rin Chupeco, The Girl from the Well is a sliver of delicious J-horror in literary form. While rooted in Japanese horror film and lore, Chupeco’s novel also plays with familiar contemporary YA horror tropes – the girl ghost who is compelled to help the human boy and keep him from harm – but with a delightfully sadistic twist.”

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